• Jim Beam - Make History
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  • Brendan Philip


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Brendan Philip
  • What kind of music influenced your craft?

    The music that influenced my craft the most is hard to narrow down into one genre; however the tie that binds the artists and music that I do listen to are the ones who have created an entire world and ideology to accompany the music. Groups like Parliament/Funkadelic, Sun Ra's Arkestra, Prince, James Brown, or David Bowie are just a surface to a layer cake of people who have made their music grander by tacking on a whole vision for your senses!

  • What is the history making event that has occurred in your lifetime that has influenced you most?

    When I got the opportunity to go to OVO Fest and see OutKast in 2014 with my homies, that may have been the most pivotal musical moment for me. I've been listening to them since ATLiens in '96 on cassette! At the end of the day they probably truly represent my musical leanings and the type of boundaries I constantly seek to push.

  • If you could have dinner with any musician or composer (alive or dead) in history who would it be and why?

    I would probably choose Miles Davis for a dinner date, I just feel like he is still quite a mystery to me; I've listened to a ton of his work and have an autobiography by him that I have had for maybe 7 years and just haven't read. I feel like he would be great to have dinner with in an ideal world because what intrigues me most about him was his graceful ability to up the ante in the jazz world and be fearless in challenging the music world at large with his immense amount of colour, discipline and technical aptitude.

  • In 10 years what do you want people to be saying about your music?

    In 10 years I would love for people to say that my music took them places they didn't know existed in their minds. I just want people to have fun and dance and make babies to the music. And enjoy this art that is the spirit of freedom and imagination in the most engaging way, not just for the sake of escapism.

  • What album in history would you say was groundbreaking for its time?

    The album I consider to be groundbreaking for its time is 'The Headphone Masterpiece' by Cody ChesnuTT. This work represented a new age for the black musician and is a like a holy grail of sorts when it comes to creating my own music. It's R&B, but I love that it also distorts the idea that black people in the western world must only create music that is rooted in gospel and soul, respectively. This double disc is as much Marvin Gaye as it is Velvet Underground BUT still all Cody and his uninhibited self in the throws of North Hollywood. PLUS he clearly is a major reference point for some of Kanye's newer work like 'Only One', no shade Paul McCartney.

Brendan Philip created this playlist to reflect the moments & music that have made history in his personal journey as an artist.

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  • Calvin Love


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Calvin Love
  • What kind of music influenced your craft?

    Rock n Roll & Pop Music

  • What is the history making event that has occurred in your lifetime that has influenced you most?

    Hmmm.. likely the passing of Kurt Cobain. At the time I was still quite young but I had a cousin who was very much into Nirvana. At 16 he had a tattoo of their name on his forearm. His hair was long and bleached and he smoked cigarettes. I thought he was the coolest. We would listen to Nirvana tapes and I would watch my cousin play all their songs on the guitar. At the time, I was unsure of who my cousin was idolizing and what profound effect Nirvana had on youth culture at that time. But, when Cobain passed I remembered the name and his face and instantly went and bought Nirvana's "Nevermind". I would listen to his CD's along with Hendrix, Black Sabbath, and Clash records trying to imitate them while standing on top of my bed, amplifier cranked trying to produce a single note out of my guitar. Through this, I discovered performance and that "lost in the music" feeling (even though there was no audience at the time of the performance) is what I still chase today and is one of the many reasons why I pursue music.

  • If you could have dinner with any musician or composer (alive or dead) in history who would it be and why?

    That's a tough one but likely David Byrne. Why? Because I think he is damn smart, a fantastic performer and has a beautiful mind. He has also successfully navigated his way through the music world, and all the while maintained a life spanning career in a tough business. I would love to ask him sooo many things. Second choice would be a walk and a smoke in the park with Chet Baker.

  • In 10 years what do you want people to be saying about your music?

    Well, in 10 years if people are still even talking about my record then that's a pretty amazing compliment in its own right. But, in 10 years if people say that my records made them feel something, made them love someone, inspired them or guided them through a rough spell in life, then I have done something right. All in all, at the end of the day, if a connection has been made through lyric, melody or vibration, that's all I can ask and hope for.

  • What album in history would you say was groundbreaking for its time?

    Another tough question!! Yeeesh, probably Kraftwerk- Autobahn, which I feel mirrors a lot of what I hear today, but composed in the early 70s. Hell, I mean, that's what I've used on my last two records; drum machines and synths! I just really feel they were way ahead of their time, and making music for the future.

Calvin Love created this playlist to reflect the moments & music that have made history in his personal journey as an artist.

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  • Cold Creek County


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Cold Creek County
  • What kind of music influenced your craft?

    We constantly listen to a wide range of music but it's Rock, Pop & Country that play the strongest pull on our musical style.

  • What is the history making event that has occurred in your lifetime that has influenced you most?

    We all grew up around music, within musical families, and with musical influences all around us. It was inevitable that these [influences would] eventually bring each of us into the music world we live in and love today.

  • If you could have dinner with any musician or composer (alive or dead) in history who would it be and why?

    This was unanimous! We would have dinner with David Grohl. His legacy of talent, musicianship, craft and performance is what makes us all hold him in high esteem.

  • In 10 years what do you want people to be saying about your music?

    'Even now 10 years later, Cold Creek County's first album is still timeless!'

  • What album in history would you say was groundbreaking for its time?

    Michael Jackson's "Thriller" and Queen's "Night at the Opera" would be a tie in our books!

Cold Creek County created this playlist to reflect the moments & music that have made history in their personal journey as an artist.

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  • Francesco Yates


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Francesco Yates
  • What kind of music influenced your craft?

    The type of music that has influenced my music the most would be music that is very visual. The kind of music used for a movie. Something that captures moments and breaks all the boundaries of genre and just allows the listener to feel the music instead of categorizing it. From Queen's “A Night at the Opera" to Biggie's "Life After Death" regardless of what genre that music is classified as, I'm influenced by music that can stand on its own two feet and withstand the test of time.

  • What is the history making event that has occurred in your lifetime that has influenced you most?

    The history making event in my own career so far would probably have to be when I did my first live show and ultimately began my journey. I remember everything on the winding road took a shift from that point on and for the better. It was a moment of clarity for me and brought with it a moment of belonging. It felt right and like I belonged on the stage performing. From that time when I got that first adrenaline rush, I have never turned back. There is typically nothing that ever quite compares to your first time.

  • If you could have dinner with any musician or composer (alive or dead) in history who would it be and why?

    If I could have dinner with anyone it would probably be John Lennon of The Beatles. I would love to hear everything and anything he had to say. I feel like we would have such great conversation and I could sit for hours listening to his stories and philosophies. What he inspired in this world is one day what I hope to do with my music, in some capacity. He spoke his truth and people recognized and received that message and it became a global force, through the medium of music; the ultimate language.

  • In 10 years what do you want people to be saying about your music?

    In 10 years, I want people to be still talking about my music. Whether good or bad I want the music to last that long, if not further. My one wish is that I'm not here only for the moment but many more and I would like for my music to stand the test of time like the greats did!

  • What album in history would you say was groundbreaking for its time?

    For its time and all of time, "Songs in the Key of Life" by Stevie Wonder is an incredible piece of work. Something spiritual exists within that body of work like no other. To me, it's the most pure form of musicianship and I have yet to experience something on a musical level that could hold a match to it. Stevie is intricate, detailed and honest with his approach and delivery. If you have not yet heard this album, you're not living.

Francesco Yates created this playlist to reflect the moments & music that have made history in his personal journey as an artist.

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  • Lyon


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Lyon
  • What kind of music influenced your craft?

    I grew up playing and listening to classical violin and piano music. I was really drawn to all the Romantic Era stuff; beautiful soaring melodies that expressed intense feelings in the music. I think that's why I sing the way I do... a little bit dreamy and flowy, like a violin. Then I fell in love with pop music, and specifically how much raw human emotion can be translated through an incredible vocal delivery...free, and at times perfectly imperfect, if that makes sense. Then I started to listen to more electronic-based songs... the whole Drive Soundtrack really inspired my Indian Summer EP. Nowadays, I just appreciate good songwriting, no matter what the genre. I just want to feel something when I listen to it.

  • What is the history making event that has occurred in your lifetime that has influenced you most?

    I remember when American Idol started the reality show craze. In my small town, I felt like the mentality was that the big powerful "American Idol voice" was the ultimate sound a singer could have. Since I didn't have that kind of voice, I really didn't consider myself a singer for the longest time. I played and wrote songs and used my voice just as a way of communicating ideas. It wasn't until probably 5 or 6 years ago that I grew to be more comfortable with my own voice and its own unique qualities.

  • If you could have dinner with any musician or composer (alive or dead) in history who would it be and why?

    The first person that pops into my head is Cyndi Lauper. I don't know why, hah! "Time After Time" is my favourite song, and I think she would have some amazing stories to tell.

  • In 10 years what do you want people to be saying about your music?

    I think it would be really cool to find out that my song was the soundtrack to a moment in someone's life... maybe it's their wedding song, or it's what they turn up in the car really loud at night, while their heart is breaking in two, because that's the only thing that speaks to them in that moment. Some kind of real, genuine, human connection.

  • What album in history would you say was groundbreaking for its time?

    I struggled with this question a little bit, because there are so many classics to choose from... but I think the soundtrack to the O.C. is actually quite groundbreaking for its time. As a teenager growing up in the suburbs, I was only exposed to whatever was popular on the radio, and that was the first show to really introduce indie pop/alternative songs. "Hide and Seek" by Imogen Heap, or Nada Surf's cover of "If You Leave" are two moments that come to mind... I think it really paved the way for many shows and soundtracks after it... and in turn was an alternative way to finding new songs and artists. Those songs made you feel everything that was happening in such an intense way. Kind of what I crave in real life.

Lyon created this playlist to reflect the moments & music that have made history in her personal journey as an artist.

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  • Milk & Bone


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Milk and Bone
  • What kind of music influenced your craft?

    We listen to a lot of electronic pop music. Bands like Beach House, Purity Ring and James Blake have influenced us with their use of synths and electronic drums. When it comes to vocals, we have very different references. Laurence has a blues background, and Camille has a more classical and pop background. We complete each other in that way.

  • What is the history making event that has occurred in your lifetime that has influenced you most?

    Laurence: It's hard to name a main event. But having been a part of the music world since a young age (my dad's a musician), I had the opportunity to attend many, many shows. I think every artist I saw perform gave me a little push towards wanting to create my own material and to be a performing artist myself.

    Camille: I have to answer in two parts.

    When I was twelve I was cast in Cirque du Soleil's Quidam as lead singer for their Asia Pacific tour. So for two years I performed at least 5 times a week in front of 2000 people in foreign countries. That was the moment I knew I had to perform.

    As a teenager, I was rather emo (read very). I'd write in my diary A LOT. Mainly about boys and my impossible relationships with them. Soon my diary entries became poetry, and from poetry became songs. From that moment on, songs became my only means of intimate expression. And that was also the moment I decided I was going to combine that need to write with my need to perform.

  • If you could have dinner with any musician or composer (alive or dead) in history who would it be and why?

    Laurence: I truly admire Kendrick Lamar's work. I'm a fan of his flow, his lyrics and the people he choses to collaborate with. He seems to be doing music for all the good reasons and I would love to hang out with him one time (or more...).

    Camille: Arca. In the last few years, he's the one artist who has absolutely changed the way I see and hear and live music. I would love to spend a few hours with him, pick his brain, and figure out what kind of person he is and how that influences his work

  • In 10 years what do you want people to be saying about your music?

    That it represents a certain era.

  • What album in history would you say was groundbreaking for its time?

    Laurence: Xen, from Arca is for sure an avant-garde album for its time. The musical texture, the melodies and sounds are futuristic and it's delicious.

    Camille: I think we have a thing for Arca. The album that has changed everything for me was Arca's &&&&& mixtape. That mixtape was my introduction to Arca and I remember not being able to listen to anything else for days. Was it weeks? I don't remember. The way he uses sound and doesn't mind the grid fascinates me. I've grown up listening to classical and pop, which is as square as you can probably get. To me that mixtape was a huge help in the emancipation process from that more mainstream education I had put myself through at a younger age.

Milk & Bone created this playlist to reflect the moments & music that have made history in their personal journey as an artist.

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  • Scott Helman


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Scott Helman
  • What kind of music influenced your craft?

    When I was a kid I found artists that were more of …artists. Like The Band, Neil Young and Kurt Cobain/Nirvana – I think the reason they were so cool to me was because they were artists instead of just being singers. I started realizing what being an artist meant. That, in congruence with going to art school was probably the reason why I started making music in the way I do and with the perspective that I have of what I think art is. Those artists were the ones that opened my eyes and made me realize "Woah, these people aren't just musicians, and they don't just sing and write songs – they're true artists."

  • What is the history making event that has occurred in your lifetime that has influenced you most?

    Personally, things that involve injustice or inequality always affect me. Inequality is something that, no matter the issue, always hits home for me and I am always inspired by that because I think that it's the root of all conflicts. I grew up in a community and a place where everybody was equal and everyone was allowed to express themselves. So I get very passionate and inspired to act when I see that there are people in the world that don't have that freedom and don't get to feel safe because of who they are. That's what music is for: to make connections with people and to let them know they are a part of something bigger.

  • If you could have dinner with any musician or composer (alive or dead) in history who would it be and why?

    John Lennon, because he brought a perspective that I don't think anybody had brought before - to music and to people in general. He was also around [during] a time that I am really interested in – a time where people were empowered and the idea of changing the world was real and practiced by people. Musically, I think he was the leader of that movement.

  • In 10 years what do you want people to be saying about your music?

    I don't really look into the future that way because I try to stay in the moment and not concern myself with the idea of a legacy being valuable. So I guess I'd say that I don't really care, but at the same time I would want people to say that I was a nice person and that I was kind and loving.

  • What album in history would you say was groundbreaking for its time?

    There's so many: Dark Side of the Moon – Pink Floyd, Sgt. Pepper's [Lonely Hearts Club Band] – The Beatles, Nevermind – Nirvana. The one that I relate to the most in terms of the era I grew up with was Nevermind because I was around after the grunge gasp, but I was still feeling the aftershock of the whole movement. I think that even though grunge music was an extension of punk music, all the things that we do now are still related. Even in pop music: the concept of absurdity, apathetic teenagers and not really knowing who we are or what's going on.

    Nirvana, that album and that whole movement was so ground breaking – It's not that it created, but it identified a massive group of people that thought a certain way and looked at the world a certain way but had yet to be identified. There was Punk music, but I don't think that Punk music successfully put a finger on the 'weirdo' kids of America. It was still kind of a cool thing to be punk, but it wasn't cool to be grunge until grunge became way more popular, of course. There are so many answers but that is the one that I probably connect to the most because my favorite bands all talk about those ideas and I think it's definitely inspired by Nirvana.

Scott Helman created this playlist to reflect the moments & music that have made history in his personal journey as an artist.

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  • Shash'U


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Shash U
  • What kind of music influenced your craft?

    West coast 80's Electro funk, old school Hip Hop, Electronic soundtracks, Vaporwave, Chillwave, Break Records.

  • What is the history making event that has occurred in your lifetime that has influenced you most?

    Birth & evolution of Hip Hop, and the invention of cassette tapes.

  • If you could have dinner with any musician or composer (alive or dead) in history who would it be and why?

    Shuki Levy, because he basically composed giant classics for all the popular North American cartoons that he imported in the 80s & 90s.

  • In 10 years what do you want people to be saying about your music?

    I just want people to have something different to listen to.

  • What album in history would you say was groundbreaking for its time?

    Afrika Bambaataa - Planet Rock

Shash'U created this playlist to reflect the moments & music that have made history in his personal journey as an artist.

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  • The Elwins


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The Elwins
  • What kind of music influenced your craft?

    We've been influenced by all kinds of music and it has changed a lot over the years are as well. When the band started in high school, Travis was kind of our musical guru. He was always discovering new bands and showing us what was good. Some of the big bands for us at that time were The Flaming Lips, The Strokes, Of Montreal, Wilco, Sondre Lerche and Weezer. Also we've been influenced a lot by our amazing Canadian friends that are making awesome music like Born Ruffians, Arkells and Tokyo Police Club. Now we listen to a little bit of everything. It's cool to find what you connect with and can enjoy in every genre. There's always something new to learn about in music which is really exciting!

  • What is the history making event that has occurred in your lifetime that has influenced you most?

    I would say that the time that we made the decision to really go for it with the band. We had been playing together for a while but it was pretty casual, a show here and there but not many plans. Before we made our first full length [album] we decided together that this was what we wanted to do and to go all in. That moment influenced all our decisions since then so greatly. It's really different feeling that you're all working together towards the same end and that everyone is putting their full effort in.

  • If you could have dinner with any musician or composer (alive or dead) in history who would it be and why?

    For me it would be Frank Zappa. He was a huge influence on me and as I discovered more about him he became a real role model. To me, he was a man of great depth and character. He always stood up for what he believed in. He was an extremely determined worker and was completely dedicated to his craft.

  • In 10 years what do you want people to be saying about your music?

    It's our plan to still be making music together in 10 years. My hope is that people will look back on our career and say we are a band that took risks and didn't repeat themselves. A band that pushed their own boundaries and made music worth making! Music that represents what we believe in and who we are. Music with purpose!

  • What album in history would you say was groundbreaking for its time?

    I would say The Beach Boys 'Smile'. It was the album the song 'Good Vibrations' was supposed to be on but never came out until very recently. There's an amazing interview with Brian Wilson where he talks about how their label didn't want to put it out as a single but they wanted to lead with it. It ended up coming out how the band [had] wanted [it to] and became a huge success. When you listen to the song and kind of analyze it, it doesn't really fit into the format of most hit songs. It has a really wacky arrangement. But it was an undeniable song and I think very ahead of its time. They were doing some really amazing work on that album. Here's the interview.

The Elwins created this playlist to reflect the moments & music that have made history in their personal journey as an artist.

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  • Wes Mack


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Wes Mack
  • What kind of music influenced your craft?

    My background is a fairly eclectic one, musically speaking. My father was, and is, a musician (he played in a band called The Sugar and Spice and had a number one hit in Canada called "The Cruel War" back in 1969). So from an early age music was always a big part of my life. Some of my earliest memories are taking road trips with my parents listening to Hank Williams Sr, The Beatles, Ian Tyson and The Beach Boys – a wide canvas to be sure.

    As a teenager I played in a band covering all kinds of songs, and writing in genres ranging from rock to funk to country and everything in between. I was lucky enough to play in a number of different bands in different roles, playing guitar, drums, bass, mandolin, keys and singing. I find having that kind of background has been helpful in crafting songs and in thinking about a song as both a whole entity and as the nuts and bolts that make it up.

    These days I think my taste is still very wide and I like to listen to all kinds of music. Within the contemporary country genre though, there are a number of artists that I am influenced by. Some of the larger ones being Eric Church, Dierks Bentley and Keith Urban.

  • What is the history making event that has occurred in your lifetime that has influenced you most?

    I'm not entirely certain if my own life events qualify as historic. But in terms of the road that has led me to where I am now I would point to a concert I saw in 2008: Dierks Bentley played the Coca-Cola stage at the Calgary Stampede. The stage was not typically a "country" stage and the people in the audience ranged from his fans to total newcomers. I especially recall seeing a fellow with a green Mohawk at the start of the show looking rather dubious, only to catch a glimpse of him during Dierks' encore dancing and yelling along.

    I really admired the showmanship on that stage. And as someone who had come from a greater rock background as a teenager, I was captivated by how he brought the more harsh elements of rock together with the warmth and storytelling and melodic structures of country music.

    I woke up the next day and wrote my first country song.

  • If you could have dinner with any musician or composer (alive or dead) in history who would it be and why?

    I'm not typically the kind of person who aspires to meet any of my musical idols. I typically air on the side of enjoying their music and leaving it at that. Though if I were to choose someone to have dinner with I think that George Harrison would be my selection – he's a giant, and I admire so greatly the works of his career from his early days to his later years.

  • In 10 years what do you want people to be saying about your music?

    Not to dodge the question here, but I always feel that the reaction people have to my music should be their own. I think that with all music, and art in general, the artist can only create something to a point, and then it is up to those who experience it to give it meaning. Often I hear fans telling me about what a song of mine made them feel or what it got them through (be it happy or sad) and initially I was surprised at times to the ends that they were reaching. I now welcome that feeling and am glad to see people extracting relevance from my work in their lives – often in ways I never intended.

    With my music I tend to be a bit of a control freak right up until the final phases of completion, but once it is out there in the world I want people to make what they will of it. In 10 years, if people are still feeling something from my music, relating it to their lives and finding value in it then I'll be content.

  • What album in history would you say was groundbreaking for its time?

    There are so many candidates for this one. But I'm going to have to talk about Nirvana's Nevermind as it was important to me growing up (though I was hearing it many years later). I find an album like this to be interesting because when you look back on it, it seems so logical (it's a great rock album and has a massive amount of passion and performance in it) and fits in with where rock music went. But at the time of making it, it would have been a giant risk. It changed the landscape of modern rock away from hair bands and into Grunge and what that grew into later. Those moments in music history interest me because on the eve of its release no one could have guessed the effect it would have.

    I feel I would be remiss if I didn't mention this similar phenomenon for the artist I am (as I write this) currently on tour with, Shania Twain. Her release in the 90's also changed the entire landscape of country music, redefining the rules of songwriting and production within the genre, and opening it to new sounds and styles that had not been present before. I find moments like these inspiring because they really show the value in taking musical risks and making music that you believe in.

Wes Mack created this playlist to reflect the moments & music that have made history in his personal journey as an artist.

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  • Yoan


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Yoan
  • What kind of music influenced your craft?

    I'd say that all country, folk, blues, southern rock, swampy-outlaw style really influenced me. What really gets me is the attitude in this music.

  • What is the history making event that has occurred in your lifetime that has influenced you most?

    The first time I ever sang in front of an audience. I was 16 years old, there were over 300 people. My dad had a gig and he invited me to sing "There ain't no good chain gain" with him. When I started to sing I felt so good, I felt unchained!

  • If you could have dinner with any musician or composer (alive or dead) in history who would it be and why?

    Tom Jones! He is one of my favorite singers, I like his voice, I like the way he sings, he is very charismatic and he also has a lot of experience. I would ask him for advice.

  • In 10 years what do you want people to be saying about your music?

    I would want people to say that my music soothes and elevates the soul... Singing heals me, It would be amazing if my songs could heal others too.

  • What album in history would you say was groundbreaking for its time?

    Wanted! by The Outlaws. I think it played a big role in the birth of new country and not only in country music but in rock, blues and more.

Yoan created this playlist to reflect the moments & music that have made history in his personal journey as an artist.

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  • Young Empires


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Young Empires
  • What kind of music influenced your craft?

    I grew up listening to 80's music. I love the sounds/songs that they were able to create in a time where technology was so new and anything was possible. It allowed a new kind of music to evolve with no rules and no boundaries. It's very similar to today in a world with so many artists and so much individuality. It inspires me.

  • What is the history making event that has occurred in your lifetime that has influenced you most?

    In the 90's I was really into punk and ska. It laid the ground for rhythm in my life. I remember my friend Garret showing me a band called Lagwagon. I had never heard anything like it. It completely opened my eyes from the mainstream junk I was so sick of hearing. I didn't even have drums yet but I was tapping on everything trying to learn how to play their songs. I did that in anticipation so when I finally bought a drum kit I could just play my heart out.

  • If you could have dinner with any musician or composer (alive or dead) in history who would it be and why?

    Quincy Jones. I think we all remember THRILLER. I would [choose Quincy] to pick his brain in regards to how [he] and MJ worked and wrote together. That album changed music at the time.

  • In 10 years what do you want people to be saying about your music?

    "It was a fun band to listen to."

  • What album in history would you say was groundbreaking for its time?

    Daft Punk - Discovery

Young Empires created this playlist to reflect the moments & music that have made history in their personal journey as an artist.

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  • Zerbin


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Zerbin
  • What kind of music influenced your craft?

    Our influences are broad. Everything from Jonsi to Dave Matthews. The one thing that pulls them together seems to be a layering of rhythm and instrumentation with an ability to connect with emotion and the soul of the listener.

  • What is the history making event that has occurred in your lifetime that has influenced you most?

    Sept 11th and the World Trade Center attacks have marked our generation immeasurably. The wars initiated by Western governments and the policy changes that have taken place have scarred our world deeply. Eroding many of the fundamental rights and freedoms of a truly democratic society.

  • If you could have dinner with any musician or composer (alive or dead) in history who would it be and why?

    This guy David from the Old Testament who would wrestle bears while taking breaks from jamming on his harp.

  • In 10 years what do you want people to be saying about your music?

    I'd want them to be able to sit down and recount a moment where one of our songs touched their life in some significant way.

  • What album in history would you say was groundbreaking for its time?

    Kanye West - 808 & Heartbreak. Defined the emergence of the new pop.

Zerbin created this playlist to reflect the moments & music that have made history in their personal journey as an artist.

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